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fennel

Pronunciation: [FEHN-uhl]

Categories: Fennel

There are two main types of this aromatic plant, both with pale green celerylike stems and bright green feathery foliage. Florence fennel, also called finocchio, is cultivated throughout the Mediterranean and in the United States. It has a broad, bulbous base that's treated like a vegetable. Both the base and stems can be eaten raw in salads or cooked in a variety of methods such as braising, sautéing or in soups. The fragrant, graceful greenery can be used as a garnish or snipped like dill and used for a last-minute flavor enhancer. This type of fennel is often mislabeled "sweet anise," causing those who don't like the flavor of licorice to avoid it. The flavor of fennel, however, is sweeter and more delicate than anise and, when cooked, becomes even lighter and more elusive than in its raw state. Common fennel is the variety from which the oval greenish-brown fennel seeds come. The seeds are available whole and ground and are used in both sweet and savory foods, as well as to flavor many liqueurs. They should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than six months. Though common fennel is bulbless, its stems and greenery are used in the same ways as those of Florence fennel. Fennel is available year-round—choose clean, crisp bulbs with no sign of browning. Any attached greenery should be a fresh green color. Refrigerate, tightly wrapped in a plastic bag, up to five days. Fennel is rich in vitamin A and contains a fair amount of calcium, phosphorus and potassium.